With bond deadlines looming, Russia days away from default

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With bond deadlines looming, Russia days away from default

Russia has failed to meet the deadlines because mounting sanctions are cutting off avenues to transfer the cash.

Light trails from heavy traffic on Tverskaya Street by the State Historical Museum in Moscow, Russia
A default would seal Russia’s pariah status in the market for decades to come [File: Andrey Rudakov/Bloomberg]

By Bloomberg NewsBloomberg

Published On 23 Jun 202223 Jun 2022

Russia faces yet another bond payment test this week, with just days remaining before it potentially slides into its first foreign default in a century.

Three interest transfers totaling almost $400 million are due on Thursday and Friday, but more pressing is a Sunday-night deadline on previous missed payments from late May.

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Those funds — about $100 million of bond coupons — are stuck due to international sanctions, and the grace period to find a solution expires at the end of the day on June 26. At that point, Russia will effectively be in default, unless it somehow gets payments through to sufficient holders of the debt.

It’s not that the government lacks the will or the money to pay. Billions of dollars of energy revenue pour into Kremlin coffers each week.

Rather, it’s failed to meet the deadlines because mounting sanctions are cutting off avenues to transfer the cash.

Russia's grace period on a missed bond payment is about to expire
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The goal in the White House is to punish the Kremlin’s invasion of Ukraine by sealing its pariah status in the market for decades to come with the country’s first foreign default since the Bolshevik revolution more than a century ago.

Russia argues that it’s being forced into default, and tried to find workarounds. It said its obligations will be deemed to have been fulfilled once payment is made in rubles, according to a decree signed by President Vladimir Putin setting out a mechanism for servicing the bonds. Earlier, Finance Minister Anton Siluanov had said the government would transfer rubles that could then be converted into foreign currencies.

“We’ve done everything we can to lead the horse to water, but it’s not up to us whether it wants to drink or not,” Siluanov said last week.

For the rest of this week, attention will be on t

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