The Food Bank FIRST:
Four-Ingredient Recipes for Stove-Top
Recipes contributed by United Church Women’s Groups.
Compiled by Jan C. Steven, Registered Social Worker (RSW)
Reviewed by Neal Glauser, Registered Dietitian (RD)
Formatted by Barbara Wiinholt
2
Table of Contents
Guidelines for FIRST………………………………………..3
Acknowledgements…………………………………………. 3
Notes from Neal Glauser, RD……………………………..4
Using Canada’s Food Guide to Meet your
Nutrition Needs at a Food Bank………………………… 5
Soups………………………………………………………….. 6
Salads.…………………………………………………………7

Share with:


Main Meals…………………………………………………… 8
Desserts……………………………………………………… 12
Information about Food Banks in Canada………..…. 13
3

Guidelines for FIRST
The guidelines used in collecting these recipes were as follows:

  1. All ingredients must be non-perishable, inexpensive, available from most food banks,
    and widely liked.
  2. Recipes must be “stove top” as user may not have an oven.
  3. Recipes should have no more than four ingredients – excluding water, oil, spices, and
    other flavourings (a couple of recipes have an extra ingredient or two).
  4. Cooking time should be half an hour or less.
    Acknowledgements
    We would like to thank everyone involved in the compilation of this booklet. Although we
    have tried to give credit to all of the contributors, the sources were varied and some names
    may have been missed with our apologies. We would like to recognize the United Church of
    Canada for helping to get the word out. In Sudbury, we thank the Salvation Army, the
    Inner City Home, the Blue Door Café, the Elgin St. Mission, and All Peoples United Church
    for their ideas.
    4
    Notes from Neal Glauser, RD

Meeting Your Nutritional Requirements
You can meet all of your nutrition requirements when using a food bank; the key is to
follow a balanced diet using the foods that are available to you. Are you wondering what a
balanced diet is? Take a look at Canada’s Food Guide to Healthy Eating. Canada’s Food
Guide to Healthy Eating provides information on how many servings a day you need from
the four food groups to meet your nutrition needs. Copies of this guide can be found online
at www.healthcanada.gc.ca/food guide or at your Public Health Unit. Many food banks
offer a variety of foods from these four food groups, making it possible to meet the
recommendations of Canada’s Food Guide to Healthy Eating. The chart on the following
page lists foods from the four foods groups that are often found in food banks. Use this
chart to help you meet your nutrition needs by choosing the recommended number of
servings from these food groups.
Tips for Following a Low Salt Diet
Using Food Found in a Food Bank
Some people follow a low-salt diet. A physician or dietitian may suggest this if you have
high blood pressure, kidney stones, kidney disease, or another condition that requires
reduced salt intake.
Foods from a food bank are often high in salt. Why is this? Canned or packaged foods,
which make up a large portion of foods available at a food bank, are often high in salt. For
people that do not need a low-salt diet, this does not pose a problem. Those that are on a
low-salt diet, however, may want to choose some of the lower salt foods from the food bank.
For information on low-salt food choices visit www.dietitians.ca (click on Eat Well, Live
Well). Note that when using canned foods, you can reduce the amount of salt you consume
by draining out the liquid from the can and rinsing the food thoroughly with water.
Tips for Following a Low Saturated/Trans Fat Diet
Using Food Found in a Food Bank
Some people with high cholesterol levels are advised by their physician or dietitian to
consume a diet low in saturated and trans fat. A diet low in saturated and trans fat can
help reduce cholesterol levels. The food bank offers a wide variety of foods that are low in
saturated and trans fat. For information on making food choices that are low in saturated
and trans fat, visit www.dietitians.ca (click on Eat Well, Live Well). The recipes in this
booklet that are low in saturated and trans fat are marked with a for your convenience.
5
Using Canada’s Food Guide to Meet
your Nutrition Needs at a Food Bank
Try to consume at least the minimum number of servings from the four food groups each
day. Some foods found in the food bank are considered more complete meals (i.e. they
contain more than one food group). Some examples of these include canned stew, ravioli,
hearty soups and chili.
Food Group &
Recommended
Number of
Servings per Day
Examples of
1 serving size
Often found at the
food bank
Sometimes found
at the food bank
Meats &
Alternatives
2-3 servings/day
 2 tbsp peanut butter
 ¾ cup of beans or
legumes
 2.5 oz or ½ cup of
meat, poultry or fish
 2 eggs
• Peanut butter
• Canned
beans/legumes
• Canned meats,
poultry or fish
• Canned chili
• Frozen meats
• Eggs
• Meat alternatives
(vegetarian)
Grain Products
6-8 servings/day
 1 slice of bread
 ½ cup cooked rice or
pasta
 ¾ cup of cereal
 4-6 crackers
• Dried rice
• Dried or canned
pasta and noodles
• Cereals
• Crackers
• Breads
• Granola bars
• Pancake mix
• Bread-related
products (eg.
bagels, pitas,
etc.)
Milk &
Alternatives
2-3 servings/day
 1 cup of milk or soy
milk
 ¾ cup of yogurt
 1.5 oz of cheese
• Evaporated milk
• Powdered milk
• Cheese spread
• Cream soups
• Cheese
• Yogurt
• Soy milk
Fruits &
Vegetables
7-10 servings/day
 ½ cup canned or
frozen vegetables
 1 cup of raw
vegetables
 ½ cup of fresh/frozen
fruit or fruit juice
• Fruit juices
• Canned vegetables
• Canned fruits
• Canned vegetable
soups
• Tomato sauce
• Frozen
vegetables
• Dried fruits
• Fresh vegetables
Fats & Oils
30-45 mL/day
1-2 tbsp canola oil
2-3 tbsp soft
margarine
• Salad dressings
• Vegetable oils
• Margarine
• Whipped salad
dressing
6
Soups
(Recipes low in saturated or trans fat are marked with a )

Hearty Bean & Barley Soup by Norma
2 cups of water
1 can of tomatoes
1 cup of barley
1 can of beans (any kind)
1 can of mixed vegetables

Place tomatoes, water and barley in large
pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and
simmer until barley is tender (one hour or
less.) Add beans and mixed vegetables.
Heat and serve.
If available, you can add one beef or
chicken bouillon cube, and/or onion or
garlic powder or flakes, and/or pepper –
when cooking the tomatoes, water and
barley.
Minestrone Rice by Mark
3-4 cups of white rice
6-8 cups of water
1 package of dried minestrone soup mix
Put rice, minestrone soup mix and water
in a large pot and bring to a boil. Reduce
the heat to a simmer and cover for
approximately 45 minutes or until the rice
has absorbed the majority of the water.
Soup Pot Italiano by Kim and Bill
1-398ml can of baked beans
1-398ml can of stewed tomatoes, diced
1-284ml can of mushrooms, drained
1-284ml can of beef bouillon, or
1 package beef OXO plus 1 cup water
1 cup white rice
Add beans, tomatoes and juice,
mushrooms, and bouillon. Bring to a boil.
For a true one pot meal, add rice, cover
and simmer for 15-20 minutes until rice is
cooked. You can add cooked sausage.
7
Salads
(Recipes low in saturated or trans fat are marked with a )
Greek Pasta Salad by Joy
12 oz bag of spiral pasta
15 oz can of three bean salad (with liquid)
4 oz can of black olives (drain liquid)
1 can of vegetables of your choice, drained
Cook pasta according to directions. Add
rest of ingredients. If available, sprinkle
with a dash of Parmesan cheese.
German Potato Salad by Sally
2 cans of potatoes
1 small onion
¼ cup of oil
¼ cup of vinegar
Cut potatoes into bite-sized chunks. Chop
onion into small pieces. Sauté chopped
onion in oil then add potatoes. Cook for a
few minutes. When very hot, add vinegar.
You can add a little sugar if you want.
Serve hot or cold.
Peas and Carrots Salad by Athena
1 can of peas
1 can of carrots
2 tbsp salad dressing
Drain veggies thoroughly, mix in a large
bowl and add your favorite salad dressing,
ie. Italian, ranch, parmesan, pepper.
Tuna Macaroni Salad by Chris and David
2 ½ cups of macaroni
1 can of tuna
1 can of cream of mushroom soup

Cook macaroni according to package
directions. Add tuna and mushroom soup
to cooled macaroni. Salt and Pepper to
taste. Tuna may be replaced with any
other canned or flaked meat. And you can
substitute another creamed soup – such
as cream of celery.
8
Main Meals
(Recipes low in saturated or trans fat are marked with a )
Can Can Chilly by Violet
1 can of drained kidney or pinto beans
1 can of tomato sauce
1 can of green beans
Onion and/or garlic powder to taste
Chili powder and pepper to taste
Heat all ingredients together on medium
for 10 minutes to blend flavours. Add a bit
of water while cooking if it gets too thick
or begins to stick in the bottom of the pot.
Canned Salmon Patties by Nancy
1 can of salmon (about 8-10 oz)
1/2 to 1 cup crushed saltine crackers
1 egg (may use Just Whites)
1 small can of vegetables – your choice
1/4 cup chopped onion
Salt and pepper to taste.
Drain canned salmon and reserve the
liquid. Combine ingredients in a bowl and
shape into 4 salmon patties. Sauté patties
in margarine, liquid vegetable oil or
vegetable oil spray until brown on both
sides. Serve with instant mashed potatoes,
canned peas, and tartar sauce
(mayonnaise and relish).
Cheese & Tuna-Mac by Ginevra
1 box of macaroni and cheese (7.25 oz.)
1 can of tuna, drained
¼ cup of milk (usually from non-fat
powdered milk)
Vegetable oil
1 can of peas, drained
Salt and pepper to taste.
Cook pasta in water until tender. Drain
macaroni, add milk and contents of sauce
packet (add just a little oil if you need to in
order to dissolve the powder). Mix well.
Add the tuna and peas, drained. Mix the
ingredients well, salt and pepper to taste
and serve immediately.
Chicken Spaghetti by Jen
1 pound spaghetti
1 can cream of chicken soup
1 can of cheddar cheese soup
1 can of tomato soup
1 can white chicken (like in a tuna can)
Cook and drain spaghetti and return to
large pot. Add canned ingredients, warm
and serve.
9
Main Meals
(Recipes low in saturated or trans fat are marked with a )
Chicken Stir-Fried Ramen
1 (3-oz.) package chicken flavor ramen
soup mix
½ cup chopped onion
1½ tbsp vegetable oil
1 can cooked chunk chicken, drained
¼ cup of canned peas or mixed vegetables
Cook the ramen noodles separately
according to package directions, reserving
the flavoring packet for use below. Drain
and keep warm. While cooking the
noodles, sauté the onion in a large frying
pan until onion is soft. Add drained,
chunked chicken and heat until warmed
through. Stir in the contents of the ramen
soup flavoring packet, and combine until
mixed. Add the cooked, drained ramen
noodles and peas. Toss until coated.
If available, top with grated Parmesan
cheese and parsley.
Chili Con Carne by David and Chris
1 can of chili beans and sauce
1 can of stewed or diced tomatoes
1 can of red kidney beans or baked beans
Mix all ingredients together and heat well.
Try serving this dish with toast and carrot
sticks. If available – add precooked
chopped meat or precooked hamburger
and 1 fried onion.
Classic Stove-top Tuna Casserole by Neal
1 can of cream soup
1 can of tuna
½-1 bag of pasta (any type)
1 can of vegetables
Cook pasta in a large pot of boiling water
until pasta is soft.
To another pot, add 1 can of cream soup,
½ can of water, 1 can of tuna (drained), 1
can of vegetables (drained). Mix all
ingredients together. Bring mixture to a
boil and allow to simmer while pasta is
cooking. (Note: you can add additional
water if the soup mixture becomes too
thick.) Add salt and pepper to taste. Drain
cooked pasta and add to soup mixture.
Mix together and serve.

10
Main Meals
(Recipes low in saturated or trans fat are marked with a )
Corned Beef Hash by Donna
1 can of corned beef
5 medium potatoes (or 2 cans potatoes)
½ onion, chopped
1 can vegetables, drained
Dice potatoes and fry in skillet with oil
until almost crispy. Add onions and cook
for a few minutes. Break up corned beef
and add to pan. Cover and cook for several
minutes. Corned beef will melt into
mixture and start to fry. Add drained
vegetables. Remove lid and stir once in a
while, add salt and pepper to taste.
Corny Casserole by David and Chris (modified)
1 onion
1 can of flaked ham
1 can of diced or stewed tomatoes
1 can of kernel corn
1 pkg. of croutons or several slices of stale
bread
Sauté onions and flaked ham in lightly
oiled pan. Add the corn and tomatoes with
the juice. Crush the package of croutons
then add to the pan. Mix everything
together, add salt and pepper to taste. If
available, wieners or other meat can
replace the ham.
Mushrooms & Beans by Michael
1 can of cream of mushroom soup
1 can of green beans
Mix together in a pan. Heat & serve. Great
with garlic bread!
Rice and Beans by Sandy
2 cups of rice
2 large cans of red kidney beans
1 small can of ‘little white beans’
1 48 oz. jar of spaghetti sauce
Cook rice. Add rest of ingredients and
simmer until it’s hot or until you’re ready
to eat. Season to taste with chili and garlic
powder. Stir and add a little water as
needed.

Rice in Sauce by David and Chris
1 cup dry rice
1 can of pasta sauce
1 onion, diced
1 can brown beans, drained and rinsed

Sautee onion over medium heat with 1 tsp
of oil, then add beans and sauce. Cook
rice according to package directions.
When heated, pour sauce over rice in the
dish. If available, add pieces of pre-cooked
meat and peppers.
11
Main Meals
(Recipes low in saturated or trans fat are marked with a )
Sweet and Sour Spam by Karen
½ cup brown sugar
2 tsp corn starch
1 can of pineapple chunks
1 cup of water
2 tsp vinegar
1 can of Spam
Prepared rice
Combine sugar, corn starch, pineapple
juice, water and vinegar in a saucepan.
Stir over heat until it boils and thickens.
Add Spam and pineapple and heat
through. Serve over cooked rice.
Ten Minute Italian Meal by Alice
1 fresh zucchini, grated
1 can of Italian-Style tomato sauce
1 can of diced tomatoes
1 can of kidney beans
3 cups of instant rice
Mix everything together and heat until the
rice is tender. You may need to add some
more water. Garnish with Parmesan
cheese.
Tomato Macaroni and Cheese by Alice
2 cups of macaroni
1 can of cheese soup
1 can of diced tomatoes
Cook macaroni and drain, reserving about
1 cup of macaroni water. Return half of
the reserved water to the pan. Layer
macaroni, cheese and tomato back into
the pan. Cover and let simmer until
cheese has melted, approximately 5-10
minutes. Add more water if needed to keep
everything moist.
Tomato Pasta by Linda
2 cups of cooked pasta
1 can of tomatoes
1 pinch of black pepper
2 tbsp of butter
Cook pasta until soft. In another pot add 1
can of tomatoes and 2 tbsp of butter and a
pinch of black pepper and heat until the
butter melts. Add pasta and tomatoes
together.
12
Desserts
Citrus-Mallow Salad by Karen
1 can of pineapple chunks, drained
2 cans mandarin oranges, drained
1 can tropical fruit chunks, drained
1-2 cups mini marshmallows
2 bananas, if you have them
Toss all together and serve at room
temperature or cold. In the winter it
brightens up dinner a bit.
Jello Treat by Chris and David
1 small package of jello (any flavour)
1 can of fruit – peaches or pears work best
Drain the juice off the fruit and save. Place
jello powder in a bowl and stir in 1 cup of
boiling water until dissolved. Add cold
water to the fruit juice until you have one
cup. Add to jello mix and stir. Place in
fridge until almost set, then add the fruit
and mix in. Return to fridge to finish
setting process.
Optional: Cool whip or marshmallows
mixed in after jello sets or Cool whip or ice
cream dabbed on top.
Peanut Butter Balls by many contributors
1/4 cup honey
1/3 cup peanut butter
1/2 cup powdered milk
Mix these ingredients together and shape
into balls and EAT! If available, you can
add 1/3 cup coconut. You can also
experiment by adding protein powder for
some of the powdered milk.

The Food Bank FIRST:
Four-Ingredient Recipes for Stove-Top
Recipes contributed by United Church Women’s Groups.
Compiled by Jan C. Steven, Registered Social Worker (RSW)
Reviewed by Neal Glauser, Registered Dietitian (RD)
Formatted by Barbara Wiinholt
2
Table of Contents
Guidelines for FIRST………………………………………..3
Acknowledgements…………………………………………. 3
Notes from Neal Glauser, RD……………………………..4
Using Canada’s Food Guide to Meet your
Nutrition Needs at a Food Bank………………………… 5
Soups………………………………………………………….. 6
Salads.…………………………………………………………7

Main Meals…………………………………………………… 8
Desserts……………………………………………………… 12
Information about Food Banks in Canada………..…. 13
3

Guidelines for FIRST
The guidelines used in collecting these recipes were as follows:

  1. All ingredients must be non-perishable, inexpensive, available from most food banks,
    and widely liked.
  2. Recipes must be “stove top” as user may not have an oven.
  3. Recipes should have no more than four ingredients – excluding water, oil, spices, and
    other flavourings (a couple of recipes have an extra ingredient or two).
  4. Cooking time should be half an hour or less.
    Acknowledgements
    We would like to thank everyone involved in the compilation of this booklet. Although we
    have tried to give credit to all of the contributors, the sources were varied and some names
    may have been missed with our apologies. We would like to recognize the United Church of
    Canada for helping to get the word out. In Sudbury, we thank the Salvation Army, the
    Inner City Home, the Blue Door Café, the Elgin St. Mission, and All Peoples United Church
    for their ideas.
    4
    Notes from Neal Glauser, RD

Meeting Your Nutritional Requirements
You can meet all of your nutrition requirements when using a food bank; the key is to
follow a balanced diet using the foods that are available to you. Are you wondering what a
balanced diet is? Take a look at Canada’s Food Guide to Healthy Eating. Canada’s Food
Guide to Healthy Eating provides information on how many servings a day you need from
the four food groups to meet your nutrition needs. Copies of this guide can be found online
at www.healthcanada.gc.ca/food guide or at your Public Health Unit. Many food banks
offer a variety of foods from these four food groups, making it possible to meet the
recommendations of Canada’s Food Guide to Healthy Eating. The chart on the following
page lists foods from the four foods groups that are often found in food banks. Use this
chart to help you meet your nutrition needs by choosing the recommended number of
servings from these food groups.
Tips for Following a Low Salt Diet
Using Food Found in a Food Bank
Some people follow a low-salt diet. A physician or dietitian may suggest this if you have
high blood pressure, kidney stones, kidney disease, or another condition that requires
reduced salt intake.
Foods from a food bank are often high in salt. Why is this? Canned or packaged foods,
which make up a large portion of foods available at a food bank, are often high in salt. For
people that do not need a low-salt diet, this does not pose a problem. Those that are on a
low-salt diet, however, may want to choose some of the lower salt foods from the food bank.
For information on low-salt food choices visit www.dietitians.ca (click on Eat Well, Live
Well). Note that when using canned foods, you can reduce the amount of salt you consume
by draining out the liquid from the can and rinsing the food thoroughly with water.
Tips for Following a Low Saturated/Trans Fat Diet
Using Food Found in a Food Bank
Some people with high cholesterol levels are advised by their physician or dietitian to
consume a diet low in saturated and trans fat. A diet low in saturated and trans fat can
help reduce cholesterol levels. The food bank offers a wide variety of foods that are low in
saturated and trans fat. For information on making food choices that are low in saturated
and trans fat, visit www.dietitians.ca (click on Eat Well, Live Well). The recipes in this
booklet that are low in saturated and trans fat are marked with a for your convenience.
5
Using Canada’s Food Guide to Meet
your Nutrition Needs at a Food Bank
Try to consume at least the minimum number of servings from the four food groups each
day. Some foods found in the food bank are considered more complete meals (i.e. they
contain more than one food group). Some examples of these include canned stew, ravioli,
hearty soups and chili.
Food Group &
Recommended
Number of
Servings per Day
Examples of
1 serving size
Often found at the
food bank
Sometimes found
at the food bank
Meats &
Alternatives
2-3 servings/day
 2 tbsp peanut butter
 ¾ cup of beans or
legumes
 2.5 oz or ½ cup of
meat, poultry or fish
 2 eggs
• Peanut butter
• Canned
beans/legumes
• Canned meats,
poultry or fish
• Canned chili
• Frozen meats
• Eggs
• Meat alternatives
(vegetarian)
Grain Products
6-8 servings/day
 1 slice of bread
 ½ cup cooked rice or
pasta
 ¾ cup of cereal
 4-6 crackers
• Dried rice
• Dried or canned
pasta and noodles
• Cereals
• Crackers
• Breads
• Granola bars
• Pancake mix
• Bread-related
products (eg.
bagels, pitas,
etc.)
Milk &
Alternatives
2-3 servings/day
 1 cup of milk or soy
milk
 ¾ cup of yogurt
 1.5 oz of cheese
• Evaporated milk
• Powdered milk
• Cheese spread
• Cream soups
• Cheese
• Yogurt
• Soy milk
Fruits &
Vegetables
7-10 servings/day
 ½ cup canned or
frozen vegetables
 1 cup of raw
vegetables
 ½ cup of fresh/frozen
fruit or fruit juice
• Fruit juices
• Canned vegetables
• Canned fruits
• Canned vegetable
soups
• Tomato sauce
• Frozen
vegetables
• Dried fruits
• Fresh vegetables
Fats & Oils
30-45 mL/day
1-2 tbsp canola oil
2-3 tbsp soft
margarine
• Salad dressings
• Vegetable oils
• Margarine
• Whipped salad
dressing
6
Soups
(Recipes low in saturated or trans fat are marked with a )

Hearty Bean & Barley Soup by Norma
2 cups of water
1 can of tomatoes
1 cup of barley
1 can of beans (any kind)
1 can of mixed vegetables

Place tomatoes, water and barley in large
pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and
simmer until barley is tender (one hour or
less.) Add beans and mixed vegetables.
Heat and serve.
If available, you can add one beef or
chicken bouillon cube, and/or onion or
garlic powder or flakes, and/or pepper –
when cooking the tomatoes, water and
barley.
Minestrone Rice by Mark
3-4 cups of white rice
6-8 cups of water
1 package of dried minestrone soup mix
Put rice, minestrone soup mix and water
in a large pot and bring to a boil. Reduce
the heat to a simmer and cover for
approximately 45 minutes or until the rice
has absorbed the majority of the water.
Soup Pot Italiano by Kim and Bill
1-398ml can of baked beans
1-398ml can of stewed tomatoes, diced
1-284ml can of mushrooms, drained
1-284ml can of beef bouillon, or
1 package beef OXO plus 1 cup water
1 cup white rice
Add beans, tomatoes and juice,
mushrooms, and bouillon. Bring to a boil.
For a true one pot meal, add rice, cover
and simmer for 15-20 minutes until rice is
cooked. You can add cooked sausage.
7
Salads
(Recipes low in saturated or trans fat are marked with a )
Greek Pasta Salad by Joy
12 oz bag of spiral pasta
15 oz can of three bean salad (with liquid)
4 oz can of black olives (drain liquid)
1 can of vegetables of your choice, drained
Cook pasta according to directions. Add
rest of ingredients. If available, sprinkle
with a dash of Parmesan cheese.
German Potato Salad by Sally
2 cans of potatoes
1 small onion
¼ cup of oil
¼ cup of vinegar
Cut potatoes into bite-sized chunks. Chop
onion into small pieces. Sauté chopped
onion in oil then add potatoes. Cook for a
few minutes. When very hot, add vinegar.
You can add a little sugar if you want.
Serve hot or cold.
Peas and Carrots Salad by Athena
1 can of peas
1 can of carrots
2 tbsp salad dressing
Drain veggies thoroughly, mix in a large
bowl and add your favorite salad dressing,
ie. Italian, ranch, parmesan, pepper.
Tuna Macaroni Salad by Chris and David
2 ½ cups of macaroni
1 can of tuna
1 can of cream of mushroom soup

Cook macaroni according to package
directions. Add tuna and mushroom soup
to cooled macaroni. Salt and Pepper to
taste. Tuna may be replaced with any
other canned or flaked meat. And you can
substitute another creamed soup – such
as cream of celery.
8
Main Meals
(Recipes low in saturated or trans fat are marked with a )
Can Can Chilly by Violet
1 can of drained kidney or pinto beans
1 can of tomato sauce
1 can of green beans
Onion and/or garlic powder to taste
Chili powder and pepper to taste
Heat all ingredients together on medium
for 10 minutes to blend flavours. Add a bit
of water while cooking if it gets too thick
or begins to stick in the bottom of the pot.
Canned Salmon Patties by Nancy
1 can of salmon (about 8-10 oz)
1/2 to 1 cup crushed saltine crackers
1 egg (may use Just Whites)
1 small can of vegetables – your choice
1/4 cup chopped onion
Salt and pepper to taste.
Drain canned salmon and reserve the
liquid. Combine ingredients in a bowl and
shape into 4 salmon patties. Sauté patties
in margarine, liquid vegetable oil or
vegetable oil spray until brown on both
sides. Serve with instant mashed potatoes,
canned peas, and tartar sauce
(mayonnaise and relish).
Cheese & Tuna-Mac by Ginevra
1 box of macaroni and cheese (7.25 oz.)
1 can of tuna, drained
¼ cup of milk (usually from non-fat
powdered milk)
Vegetable oil
1 can of peas, drained
Salt and pepper to taste.
Cook pasta in water until tender. Drain
macaroni, add milk and contents of sauce
packet (add just a little oil if you need to in
order to dissolve the powder). Mix well.
Add the tuna and peas, drained. Mix the
ingredients well, salt and pepper to taste
and serve immediately.
Chicken Spaghetti by Jen
1 pound spaghetti
1 can cream of chicken soup
1 can of cheddar cheese soup
1 can of tomato soup
1 can white chicken (like in a tuna can)
Cook and drain spaghetti and return to
large pot. Add canned ingredients, warm
and serve.
9
Main Meals
(Recipes low in saturated or trans fat are marked with a )
Chicken Stir-Fried Ramen
1 (3-oz.) package chicken flavor ramen
soup mix
½ cup chopped onion
1½ tbsp vegetable oil
1 can cooked chunk chicken, drained
¼ cup of canned peas or mixed vegetables
Cook the ramen noodles separately
according to package directions, reserving
the flavoring packet for use below. Drain
and keep warm. While cooking the
noodles, sauté the onion in a large frying
pan until onion is soft. Add drained,
chunked chicken and heat until warmed
through. Stir in the contents of the ramen
soup flavoring packet, and combine until
mixed. Add the cooked, drained ramen
noodles and peas. Toss until coated.
If available, top with grated Parmesan
cheese and parsley.
Chili Con Carne by David and Chris
1 can of chili beans and sauce
1 can of stewed or diced tomatoes
1 can of red kidney beans or baked beans
Mix all ingredients together and heat well.
Try serving this dish with toast and carrot
sticks. If available – add precooked
chopped meat or precooked hamburger
and 1 fried onion.
Classic Stove-top Tuna Casserole by Neal
1 can of cream soup
1 can of tuna
½-1 bag of pasta (any type)
1 can of vegetables
Cook pasta in a large pot of boiling water
until pasta is soft.
To another pot, add 1 can of cream soup,
½ can of water, 1 can of tuna (drained), 1
can of vegetables (drained). Mix all
ingredients together. Bring mixture to a
boil and allow to simmer while pasta is
cooking. (Note: you can add additional
water if the soup mixture becomes too
thick.) Add salt and pepper to taste. Drain
cooked pasta and add to soup mixture.
Mix together and serve.

10
Main Meals
(Recipes low in saturated or trans fat are marked with a )
Corned Beef Hash by Donna
1 can of corned beef
5 medium potatoes (or 2 cans potatoes)
½ onion, chopped
1 can vegetables, drained
Dice potatoes and fry in skillet with oil
until almost crispy. Add onions and cook
for a few minutes. Break up corned beef
and add to pan. Cover and cook for several
minutes. Corned beef will melt into
mixture and start to fry. Add drained
vegetables. Remove lid and stir once in a
while, add salt and pepper to taste.
Corny Casserole by David and Chris (modified)
1 onion
1 can of flaked ham
1 can of diced or stewed tomatoes
1 can of kernel corn
1 pkg. of croutons or several slices of stale
bread
Sauté onions and flaked ham in lightly
oiled pan. Add the corn and tomatoes with
the juice. Crush the package of croutons
then add to the pan. Mix everything
together, add salt and pepper to taste. If
available, wieners or other meat can
replace the ham.
Mushrooms & Beans by Michael
1 can of cream of mushroom soup
1 can of green beans
Mix together in a pan. Heat & serve. Great
with garlic bread!
Rice and Beans by Sandy
2 cups of rice
2 large cans of red kidney beans
1 small can of ‘little white beans’
1 48 oz. jar of spaghetti sauce
Cook rice. Add rest of ingredients and
simmer until it’s hot or until you’re ready
to eat. Season to taste with chili and garlic
powder. Stir and add a little water as
needed.

Rice in Sauce by David and Chris
1 cup dry rice
1 can of pasta sauce
1 onion, diced
1 can brown beans, drained and rinsed

Sautee onion over medium heat with 1 tsp
of oil, then add beans and sauce. Cook
rice according to package directions.
When heated, pour sauce over rice in the
dish. If available, add pieces of pre-cooked
meat and peppers.
11
Main Meals
(Recipes low in saturated or trans fat are marked with a )
Sweet and Sour Spam by Karen
½ cup brown sugar
2 tsp corn starch
1 can of pineapple chunks
1 cup of water
2 tsp vinegar
1 can of Spam
Prepared rice
Combine sugar, corn starch, pineapple
juice, water and vinegar in a saucepan.
Stir over heat until it boils and thickens.
Add Spam and pineapple and heat
through. Serve over cooked rice.
Ten Minute Italian Meal by Alice
1 fresh zucchini, grated
1 can of Italian-Style tomato sauce
1 can of diced tomatoes
1 can of kidney beans
3 cups of instant rice
Mix everything together and heat until the
rice is tender. You may need to add some
more water. Garnish with Parmesan
cheese.
Tomato Macaroni and Cheese by Alice
2 cups of macaroni
1 can of cheese soup
1 can of diced tomatoes
Cook macaroni and drain, reserving about
1 cup of macaroni water. Return half of
the reserved water to the pan. Layer
macaroni, cheese and tomato back into
the pan. Cover and let simmer until
cheese has melted, approximately 5-10
minutes. Add more water if needed to keep
everything moist.
Tomato Pasta by Linda
2 cups of cooked pasta
1 can of tomatoes
1 pinch of black pepper
2 tbsp of butter
Cook pasta until soft. In another pot add 1
can of tomatoes and 2 tbsp of butter and a
pinch of black pepper and heat until the
butter melts. Add pasta and tomatoes
together.
12
Desserts
Citrus-Mallow Salad by Karen
1 can of pineapple chunks, drained
2 cans mandarin oranges, drained
1 can tropical fruit chunks, drained
1-2 cups mini marshmallows
2 bananas, if you have them
Toss all together and serve at room
temperature or cold. In the winter it
brightens up dinner a bit.
Jello Treat by Chris and David
1 small package of jello (any flavour)
1 can of fruit – peaches or pears work best
Drain the juice off the fruit and save. Place
jello powder in a bowl and stir in 1 cup of
boiling water until dissolved. Add cold
water to the fruit juice until you have one
cup. Add to jello mix and stir. Place in
fridge until almost set, then add the fruit
and mix in. Return to fridge to finish
setting process.
Optional: Cool whip or marshmallows
mixed in after jello sets or Cool whip or ice
cream dabbed on top.
Peanut Butter Balls by many contributors
1/4 cup honey
1/3 cup peanut butter
1/2 cup powdered milk
Mix these ingredients together and shape
into balls and EAT! If available, you can
add 1/3 cup coconut. You can also
experiment by adding protein powder for
some of the powdered milk.

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