How the LDS Church gained and clings to its foothold in Egypt — a place embedded in its theology

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How the LDS Church gained and clings to its foothold in Egypt — a place embedded in its theology

Amid the mummies, tombs and pyramids lives a land with deep religious roots for Muslims, Jews and Christians, including Latter-day Saints.

(Michael Stack | Special to The Tribune) The Sphinx and Giza Pyramid complex on the outskirts of Cairo, April 2022.

(Michael Stack | Special to The Tribune) The Sphinx and Giza Pyramid complex on the outskirts of Cairo, April 2022.

By Peggy Fletcher Stack

  | July 10, 2022, 6:00 a.m.

| Updated: 11:18 a.m.

Cairo • Egypt, with its pharaohs and pyramids, miracles and magic, mummies and tombs, sweltering heat and legendary river, may seem foreign, exotic and a tad unsettling to many Western tourists.

But the Islamic nation should feel familiar to Christians and Jews as well as Muslims. After all, it played a major role in the sacred history of the three monotheistic Abrahamic faiths — and not just as a footnote in Israelite history.

Think Moses, who was rescued from the bulrushes and raised by pharaoh’s daughter, Joseph who saved the populace from a devastating drought, and the Holy Family’s sojourn with baby Jesus.

Mormonism carries even more connections to the ancient desert kingdom than those in other Judeo-Christian traditions.

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