Ukraine war ‘aggravating’ existing global food crisis, UN warns

Share with:


Ukraine war ‘aggravating’ existing global food crisis, UN warns

‘Food is available,’ Luca Russo, the FAO’s lead analyst for food crises, tells Al Jazeera. The issue is soaring prices.

An Iranian man looks at food shelves in a supermarket as the prices of some goods increased in Tehran, Iran
An Iranian man looks at food shelves in a supermarket in Tehran, Iran, where the prices of some goods have recently increased significantly causing demonstrators to take to the streets in protest [File: Majid Asgaripour/West Asia News Agency via Reuters]

By Radmilla Suleymanova

Published On 3 Jun 20223 Jun 2022

As the cost of food soars around the world, the United Nations warns that the war in Ukraine risks aggravating inflating prices and causing a full-on global food crisis.

The UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization’s (FAO) food price index, a tool to measure prices of the most globally traded food staples, dipped in May for the second consecutive month after reaching a record in March, the UN agency said on Friday.

KEEP READING

list of 4 itemslist 1 of 4

Russia slams sanctions, seeks to blame West for food crisis

list 2 of 4

US baby formula crisis: What you need to know

list 3 of 4

‘We are going to die’: Food shortages worsen Sri Lanka crisis

list 4 of 4

US, banks unveil plan to address global food crisis

end of list

Despite the decline, the May index showed prices 22.8 percent higher compared with a year earlier, pushed higher by concerns over the Russian invasion of Ukraine – one of the world’s major bread baskets.

Luca Russo, the FAO’s lead analyst for food crises, told Al Jazeera that as Russia’s invasion of Ukraine sends energy prices higher, the cost of delivering aid has increased as well. The risk of a severe food crisis is particularly felt in the developing world, he warned.

Al Jazeera spoke with Russo this week about what worries him about the current international response, how millions could face famine while there is a global surplus of food stock, and why 2023 could be a “very, very dangerous year”.

Al Jazeera: Why is there a global food crisis right now?

ADVERTISING

Luca Russo: First of all, this is not a new crisis. The number of people facing severe food insecurity has grown dramatically in the last six years. The Ukraine war is the latest element in an extremely complex situation. The UN had seen a lot of progress in reducing the number of people facing hunger in the last 20 years. But there’s been a reversing trend in about 20, 30 countries in the last several years.

If the war in Ukraine continues, 2023 could be a very, very dangerous year.

BY LUCA RUSSIA, FAO’S LEAD ANALYST FOR FOOD CRISES

Al Jazeera: Why is that?

Russo: Fragile food systems, poor governance, conflict and climate change. In the last five, six years, the number has doubled in terms of people needing aid to survive. Events like the one in Ukraine are a source of great worry for us.

Sign up for Al Jazeera

Americas Coverage Newsletter

US politics, Canada’s multiculturalism, South America’s geopolitical rise—we bring you the stories that matter.Sign up

By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy

Al Jazeera: How is the Ukraine crisis threatening food supply?

Russo: We need to clarify that today there is no global food shortage. Food is available. To give you a number, each year, the world produces about 780 million metric tons of wheat, and the shortage for this year is only three million.

An aerial view shows a tractor spreading fertiliser on a wheat field near the village of Yakovlivka after it was hit by an aerial bombardment outside Kharkiv, as Russia's attack on Ukraine continues
An aerial view shows a tractor spreading fertiliser on a wheat field near the village of Yakovlivka after it was hit by an aerial bombardment outside Kharkiv, as Russia’s attack on Ukraine continues [File: Thomas Peter/Reuters]

Al Jazeera: So what you’re saying is that there’s no food shortage but there’s a food crisis?

ADVERTISING

Russo: There’s no food shortage but prices are escalating. One reason is the increased cost of energy. As a result of the Ukraine war, 19 countries in the last month put in place restrictive measures on food exports. All these contribute to increasing prices.

The increased price in wheat, maize and fuel means that with the same money we can deliver much less assistance.

BY LUCA RUSSO, FAO’S LEAD ANALYST FOR FOOD CRISES

Al Jazeera: What countries need aid most?

Russo: Before the Ukraine crisis, we were monitoring the famine situations in Afghanistan, Yemen, South Sudan, northeastern Nigeria, and Somalia. Changes in food prices can have a devastating effect on them.

Al Jazeera: You mentioned there is enough food. What is the problem in getting it to people in need?

Russo: The increased price in wheat and fuel means that with the same money we can deliver much less assistance. Also, sometimes you cannot reach people who are stuck in a conflict zone.

Al Jazeera: What can be done now to prevent the food crisis from getting worse?

Russo: Monitor price and food insecurity clo

 38 total views

Share with:


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.